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Ford 6.7L Powerstroke Engine

By November 6th, 2021No Comments

Ford introduced the 6.7L Powerstroke in 2011 into the F-series super duty trucks and other similar platforms, including utility trucks and school buses. The 6.7L Powerstroke is the first Powerstroke engine to be built in-house by Ford, as the previous 7.3L Powerstroke, 6.4L Powerstroke, and 6.0L Powerstroke engines were all built by Navistar International.

This Ford 6.7L Powerstroke diesel engine guide is a part of our Diesel Engine Guide series to help with buying a school bus for sale.

This article will dive further into the 6.7L Powerstroke engine including:

  • Engine Overview
  • Engine Specs
  • Towing Capacity
  • Life Expectancy
  • Maintenance Requirements
  • Typically paired transmissions
  • Common engine problems
  • Engine comparisons to the 6.0L Powerstroke and 5.9L Cummins

6.7L Powerstroke Engine Overview

Ford 6.7L Powerstroke Engine Skoolie

Ford Motor Company introduced the 6.7L Power Stroke diesel engine in 2011 as its all-new powerplant for Ford Super Duty trucks (F-250, F-350, and F-450), F-Series chassis cabs (F-350, F-450, and F-550), and Ford medium-duty trucks (F-650 and F-750). The Ford 6.7L is the fourth generation of the Power Stroke diesel engine family, but it is the first of those engines to be built in-house by Ford. 

Previous Power Stroke diesel engines (7.3L, 6.0L, 6.4L) were produced by Navistar International for Ford trucks, vans, and sports utility vehicles through a manufacturing partnership formed more than 30 years ago. Ford ended the partnership when replacing the problematic Navistar International 6.4L Power Stroke diesel engine with its own 6.7L engine for the 2011 model year Ford Super Duty trucks. Ford was able to shed losses from warranties/recalls on the Navistar International 6.4L and 6.0L Power Stroke engines and gain a competitive edge in the growing diesel segment by designing, engineering, and manufacturing its own diesel engine. 

Starting with a clean sheet, Ford designed the 6.7L Power Stroke diesel engine with 8-cylinders, an overhead valve (OHV), aluminum cylinder heads, cast-aluminum pistons, and a compacted graphite iron block. The new metal materials offered durability while taking weight off the overall engine (under 1,000 pounds without fluids) and contributing to better fuel efficiency.

During a decade of production, Ford continued to upgrade and refine the 6.7L diesel Power Stroke engine over three generations. During the first generation, Ford produced more than half a million 6.7L diesel engines from 2011 to 2014. Mechanics report the units made during the first generation are among the least reliable by comparison. However, Ford was able to work out the kinks in the second and third generations. 

The second generation of the Ford 6.7L Power Stroke diesel engine, built from 2015 to 2019, featured upgrades intended to improve reliability, torque, and performance. They include an exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) cooler flow, heavier crankshaft damper, fan clutch, and turbocharger updates.

The third generation of the Ford 6.7L Power Stroke diesel engine was introduced in 2020 and still is in production for 2022 model year Ford Super Duty trucks. In addition to more horsepower and torque, noteworthy improvements include a new steel piston design, revised variable geometry turbocharger, updated cylinder head design, and a new fuel injection system.

The 6.7L Power Stroke engines are produced at Ford’s Chihuahua Engine Plant in Mexico, and the newest version of the engine will be assembled into 2022 model-year Ford Super Duty trucks.

6.7L Powerstroke Engine Specs

Engine variationsProduction YearsHorsepowerTorque
Ford 6.7L Power Stroke2011 to present
Ford F-Series Super Duty trucks (F-250, F-350, F-450) and Ford F-Series chassis cab

2015 – 2022
Ford F-Series medium-duty trucks (F-650, F-750)
Ford pick-up trucks
Low: 390 hp @ 2800 RPM High: 475 hp @ 2800 RPM

Ford F-650, F-750
Low: 270 hp @ 2400 RPM High: 330 hp @ 2600 RPM
Ford pick-up trucks
Low: 735 lb-ft @ 1600 RPM High: 1050 lb-ft @ 1800 RPM

Ford F-650, F-750
Low: 675 lb-ft @ 1600 RPM High: 725 lb-ft @ 1800 RPM

Typical Paired Transmissions

The first and second generations of the 6.7L Power Stroke diesel engine were equipped with the Ford 6R140 TorqShift six-speed automatic transmission. The third generation of the diesel engine is equipped with the Ford 10R140 ten-speed automatic transmission. Currently, manual transmissions are not available.

6.7L Powerstroke Engine Towing Capacity

Tow capacity is affected by several different factors, depending on the year and model of the F-Series trucks. Typically, the 6.7L Power Stroke diesel engine allows Ford Super Duty trucks to tow a maximum of 37,000 pounds.

6.7L Powerstroke Life Expectancy

Mechanics report that if properly maintained, the 6.7L Power Stroke diesel engine could run for 250,000 before requiring a major repair or rebuild. 

6.7L Powerstroke Engine Maintenance Requirements

Maintenance is critical to avoid common failures in the 6.7L Power Stroke diesel engine. The engine requires B20 biodiesel and ultra-low sulfur diesel.

6.7L Powerstroke Oil Capacity: 13 quarts

Engine variationsNormal conditions
6.7L Power StrokeEngine oil & air filter: 7,500 miles/12 months
Fuel filter: 30,000 miles
Engine coolant: 100,000 miles/6 years, then 45,000 miles/3 years
Transmission fluid & filter: 150,000 miles

6.7L Powerstroke Engine Problems

These are a few common issues with the Ford 6.7L Power Stroke diesel engine:

  • Exhaust gas temperate (EGT) sensor failure – EGT sensor problems are among the most frequent issues on the Ford 6.7L Power Stroke diesel engine. Even after replacing any of the 4 EGT sensors, mechanics report they may fail again and recommend having extra sensors on hand. Symptoms include fault codes and failed emissions test.
  • Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) cooler clogging – EGR cooler problems are another common issue on the Ford 6.7L Power Stroke diesel engine. Carbon deposits can build up on the EGR cooler core and cause it to become completely clogged. Symptoms include overheating and fault codes.
  • Injection pump fail – Every generation of the Ford 6.7L Power Stroke diesel engine has suffered from break downs of a Bosch CP4.2 injection pump, due to metal-on-metal contact that allows air to sneak inside of the component. The contamination can harm the fuel system (injectors, pressure regulators, lines, etc.) and lead to expensive repairs. Symptoms include stalling, no starts, rough idle, stuttering and severe loss of power.
  • Leaks and bad bearings – Early versions of the oil burner can experience broken glow plugs, and flaws in the primary stock radiator and at the coolant inlet on the turbocharger that cause leaks.
  • Radiator coolant leaks – The Ford 6.7L Power Stroke diesel engine uses two radiators, but the primary radiator is the more common problem. Replacements can be complicated due to having two of them.
  • Turbocharger problems – Turbocharger issues primarily affect the first generation of the Ford 6.7L Power Stroke diesel engine. Failures occasionally occur with the turbo bearing. Mechanics suspect the failures are attributed to the smaller-than-normal turbocharger used for boosting torque. Ford enlarged the turbocharger in the second generation of the engine to assist with more power and torque. Symptoms include excessive smoke, oil loss, oil in the exhaust, whining sounds and power loss.
  • NOx sensor issues – NOx sensors on the first generation of the Ford 6.7L diesel engine (through 2013) is a common issue. The sensor failure causes the engine control module (ECM) to command “limp mode,” which causes the truck to become underpowered.

Ford 6.7L Powerstroke vs. 6.0L Powerstroke

Ford Motor Company and Navistar International launched the 6.0L Powerstroke diesel engine in 2003 for Ford Super Duty trucks, vans, and sport utility vehicles. The Navistar International 6.0L Power Stroke diesel engine was designed in response to increased emissions regulations. 

As part of Navistar International’s VT diesel engine family, the 6.0L Power Stroke diesel engine had the same basic structure as the Navistar International VT365 but different components to meet emissions requirements, reduce turbo lag, and create better throttle response in Ford Super Duty trucks. The 6.0L Power Stroke engine featured an exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system, fuel injection system with hydraulically actuated electronically controlled unit injectors (HEUI), four-valve cylinder heads, and a quick-spooling variable geometry turbocharger. 

Despite the advanced technology, the 6.0L Power Stroke diesel engine was regarded as one of the most problematic engines in the Power Stroke diesel engine brand line. Many of the issues with the 6.0L Power Stroke diesel engine stemmed from the emissions systems and/or lack of maintenance. Common problems included EGR clogging and cooling problems, oil cooler failures, high-pressure oil system failures, numerous electrical issues, and head bolt and head gasket failures. The engine issues escalated over the years and led to high warranty repairs, buybacks, and civil lawsuits against Ford.

Ford eventually canceled the manufacturing partnership with Navistar International partly due to the 6.0L diesel engine’s extensive recalls and warranty costs.

Ford Motor Company introduced the 6.7L Power Stroke diesel engine in 2011 as its all-new powerplant for Ford Super Duty trucks. The Ford 6.7L is the fourth generation of the Power Stroke diesel engine family, but it is the first of those engines to be built in-house by Ford. Ford was able to reduce losses from warranties/recalls of the Navistar International engines (from 6.4L and 6.0L Power Stroke engines) and gain a competitive edge in the growing diesel segment by designing, engineering and manufacturing its own diesel engine.

Feature comparisonFord 6.7L Power StrokeNavistar International (Ford)
6.0L Power Stroke
Production years2011 to present
Ford F-Series Super Duty trucks (F-250, F-350, F-450) and Ford E-Series chassis cab

2015 – 2022
Ford F-Series medium duty trucks (F-650, F-750)
2003 to 2007 Ford Super Duty Trucks
2003 to 2005 Ford Excursion SUV
2003 to 2012 Ford F-series vans, buses, & chassis cabs
HorsepowerFord pick-up trucks Low: 390 hp @ 2800 RPM High: 475 hp @ 2800 RPM

Ford F-650, F-750
Low: 270 hp @ 2400 RPM High: 330 hp @ 2600 RPM 
Low: 325 HP @ 3300 RPM High: 350 hp @ 2600 RPM
TorqueFord pick-up trucks Low: 735 lb-ft @ 1600 RPM
High: 1050 lb-ft @ 1800 RPM

Ford F-650, F-750
Low: 675 lb-ft @ 1600 RPM High: 725 lb-ft @ 1800 RPM 
Low: 560 lb-ft @ 2000 RPM
High: 570 lb-ft @ ,000 RPM  (2005 to 2007 models)

Ford 6.7L Powerstroke vs. 5.9L Cummins

The Power Stroke and Cummins diesel engine lines are both popular in consumer pick-up trucks and commercial super-duty trucks. A choice may come down to preference in the Ford Super Duty or Dodge RAM truck brands.

The 5.9 Cummins had strong brand associations with RAM medium- and heavy-duty trucks. A version of the Cummins 5.9L diesel engine was featured in Dodge pickup trucks. The Cummins 5.9L (or B Series diesel engines) went into production in 1984 for use in agricultural equipment. Known as the 6BT or 12-valve 5.9L, the engine was a popular alternative to large gasoline V8 engines. In 1998, Cummins replaced the 6BT with the 24-valve 5.9L ISB (Interact System B), which was designed for improved fuel economy and emissions.

Despite its smaller size, Cummins turbocharged diesel engines could produce significant power with decent torque at low engine speeds. The mechanical 5.9L was given a life expectancy of 350,000 miles without catastrophic failure, and mechanics report it has enough durability to outlive multiple transmissions throughout the course of its life. However, there were issues with the Cummins 5.9L, such as exhaust manifold leaks and engine block cracks. Cummins continued production of its 24-valve 5.9L ISB diesel engine until 2007 when it was retired for the Cummins 6.7L, primarily due to increased emissions regulations.

Production of Ford’s 6.7L Power Stroke diesel engine began in 2011, long after Cummins ended production of the 5.9L diesel engine. Previous Power Stroke diesel engines were produced by Navistar International for Ford trucks, vans, and sports utility vehicles through a manufacturing partnership formed decades ago. Ford ended the partnership when replacing the problematic Navistar International 6.4L Power Stroke diesel engine. 

Ford was able to reduce losses from warranties/recalls of the Navistar International engines (from 6.4L and 6.0L Power Stroke engines) and gain a competitive edge in the growing diesel segment by designing, engineering, and manufacturing its own diesel engine. The newest version of the 6.7L Power Stroke diesel engine will be assembled into 2022 model-year Ford Super Duty trucks.

Feature comparisonFord 6.7L Power StrokeCummins 5.9L 
Production years2011 to present
Ford F-Series Super Duty trucks (F-250, F-350, F-450)
Ford F-Series chassis cab 2015 – 2022
Ford F-Series medium-duty trucks (F-650, F-750)

5.9L 12-valve: 1989 to 1998 5.9L 24-valve ISB: 1998 to 2007
HorsepowerFord pick-up trucks
Low: 390 hp @ 2800 RPM
High: 475 hp @ 2800 RPM

Ford F-650, F-750
Low: 270 hp @ 2400 RPM
High: 330 hp @ 2600 RPM 
5.9L 12-valve: 215 hp @ 2,500 RPM
5.9L 24-valve ISB: 325 hp @ 2,900 RPM
TorqueFord pick-up trucks
Low: 735 lb-ft @ 1600 RPM
High: 1050 lb-ft @ 1800 RPM

Ford F-650, F-750
Low: 675 lb-ft @ 1600 RPM
High: 725 lb-ft @ 1800 RPM 
5.9L 12-valve: 440 lb-ft @ 1,600 RPM
5.9L 24-valve ISB: 600 lb-ft @ 1,600 RPM
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