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Ford 7.3L Godzilla Engine

By January 29th, 2022No Comments

The Ford 7.3L Godzilla engine was launched in 2020 and serves as a powerful gasoline fuel option to fill the sales gap between the 6.2L Boss and 6.7L Power Stroke diesel engines. The 7.3L Godzilla comes as an option in F-250, F-350, and Ford Super Duty Tremor ten-speed automatic trucks, as well as being the base engine for the F-450 to F-600 truck models, as well as the E-350 vans.

In 2021, Blue Bird bus company started to sell buses with the 7.3l Godzilla engine.

This 7.3L Godzilla engine is a part of our Engine Guide series to help with buying a school bus for sale.

This article will dive further into the 7.3L Godzilla engine that can be found in buses including:

  • Engine Overview
  • Engine Specs
  • Towing Capacity
  • Life Expectancy
  • Maintenance Requirements
  • Typically paired transmissions
  • Common engine problems
  • Engine comparisons to the 6.0L Vortec, 5.7L Vortec and Navistar T444E

7.3L Godzilla Engine Overview

The Ford 7.3L Godzilla engine is presently the largest displacement gasoline engine manufactured by Ford Motor Company. Ford launched this severe-duty engine for the 2020 model year, as it replaced the Ford 6.8 Triton V10 engine.

This naturally aspirated V8 gasoline engine features an overhead valve (OHV) pushrod design in a V configuration. It has a forged steel crankshaft, high-pressure port fuel injection, variable valve timing, and a variable displacement oil pump. With a cast-iron engine block, the Godzilla motor can handle high amounts of strain. As a result, the Godzilla engine delivers more horsepower and torque than other engine options in Ford trucks.

Since launching in the 2020 model year, the Ford 7.3L Godzilla engine has had limited time in the consumer market, and many engines may still be under warranty. Also, there has not been a lot of long-term data points on reliability. Mechanics report the average service life of the Ford 7.3L Godzilla engine is 200,000 miles, but good care and regular maintenance can extend the engine to more than 300,000 miles.

Godzilla Engine Specs

EngineProduction YearsHorsepowerTorque
Ford 7.3L Godzilla
(gasoline engine)
2020 to present430 hp @ 5500 RPM475 lb-ft @ 4000 RPM

Typical Paired Transmissions

The Ford 7.3L Godzilla engine is paired with a 10-speed automatic transmission in Ford Super Duty trucks and E-350 vans. The transmission differs from the current 10R80 found in the F-150 and is being marketed as a member of the TorqShift family.

Ford 7.3L Godzilla Towing Capacity

The Ford 7.3L Godzilla engine has a decent tow rating of 4,500 pounds. Mechanics report this gasoline-powered engine is a good choice if you need higher performance towing capabilities and want a gasoline-powered bus, truck, or van.

7.3 Godzilla Engine Life Expectancy

Mechanics report the average number of miles the Ford 7.3L Godzilla engine can last is 200,000 miles. Good care and regular maintenance can extend the engine’s service life to more than 300,000 miles.

7.3L Godzilla Engine Maintenance Requirements

Engine longevity is possible through proper maintenance of regular oil changes, engine coolant flushes, fuel filter replacements, and transmission fluid and filter replacements. Extra care is needed for engines that operate under severe or heavy-duty conditions, including excessive idling, dusty environments, and frequent hauling. Below are maintenance requirements for gasoline-powered Ford 7.3L Godzilla engines.

7.3L Godzilla Oil Capacity: 7 quarts

Engine variationsNormal conditions
Ford 7.3L Godzilla
(gasoline engine)
Engine oil & air filter: 10,000 miles
Fuel filter: 15,000 miles
Engine coolant: 150,000 miles
Transmission fluid & filter: 45,000 miles

7.3L Godzilla Engine Problems

Since launching in the 2020 model year, the Ford 7.3L Godzilla engine has had limited time in the consumer market, and many engines may still be under warranty. However, a few issues have been reported by mechanics.

  • Spark plug wiring harness failure – Early owners of the engine have noted numerous cylinder misfires, which have been linked to a faulty wiring harness. A failed harness can cause no-start or undriveable conditions if the wiring totally fails and can no longer deliver power to the spark plugs. Ford acknowledged the issue and stated it was a manufacturer defect by a supplier. Some engines still may be under warranty to repair the faulty wiring issues. If out of warranty, the sub-part is relatively inexpensive to replace.
  • Gas reliability – Owners report the Ford 7.3L Godzilla engine has poor gas mileage. It ranges from eight to nine miles per gallon when towing or around 12 miles per gallon for a mix of city and highway driving.
  • Isolated issues – A few owners have reported stuck lifters and cylinder scoring. Overall, the 7.3 Godzilla seems to be reliable and strong.

Ford 7.3L Godzilla vs. Chevy 6.0L Vortec

Chevrolet 6.0L Vortec engine specs

The Ford 7.3L Godzilla engine went into production just as the Chevy 6.0L Vortec was ending its production run. Both engines were powered with gasoline and built with power in heavy-duty and severe-duty trucks under Ford and GM brands

The Ford 7.3L Godzilla is a naturally aspirated V8 engine featuring an overhead valve (OHV) pushrod design in a V configuration. The Godzilla engine served as a powerful gasoline engine option to fill the sales gap between the 6.2L Boss and 6.7L Power Stroke diesel engines for F-250, F-350, and Ford Super Duty Tremor ten-speed automatic trucks. It is the base engine for the F-450 to F-600 truck models, as well as the E-350 van. It also can be purchased as a crate engine from the Ford Performance catalog.

General Motors produced a family of 6.0L small-block V8 gasoline engines for Chevrolet and GMC heavy-duty trucks, sports utility vehicles, and vans. Beginning in 1999, Chevy 6.0L Vortec engines powered Chevrolet Express vans, Chevrolet Silverado heavy-duty trucks (2500 and 3500), Chevrolet Suburban (2500, 3500), GMC Savana (2500, 3500 and 4500), GMC Sierra heavy-duty trucks (2500 and 3500) and GMC Yukon XL. These truck engines were based on the high-performance LS platform used for Chevrolet Corvette and Chevrolet Camaro sports cars, and some of the engine components can be interchanged. 

General Motors produced nine variants of the Chevy 6.0L Vortec engine over two decades. All the engine variants have the same basic engine components, but new technologies were added over time to increase both performance and fuel economy. For example, GM added the Active Fuel Management (AFM) system to the engine in 2005 to increase fuel economy by disabling cylinders when extra power is not needed, such as sitting at a red light.

General Motors included several alternative fuel variants in its line of Chevy 6.0L Vortec engines. The LY6 engine variant had a hybrid V8 version available from 2008 to 2013, which provided trucks with a little better fuel economy and cleaner emissions. The L77 variant, produced from 2010 to 2017, had an ethanol version. The L96 variant included a flex-fuel version, as well as a modified compressed natural gas (CNG) version. The LFA and LZ1 variants were used in GM’s hybrid trucks and sport utility vehicles.

Mechanics report both engines to tend to have low gas mileage of about 10 to 12 miles per gallon. They both are dependable engines that can last beyond 300,000 miles with minimal issues beyond regular maintenance. The trucks often outlast other chassis-related components.

In 2020, the Chevy 6.0L Vortec engine series was replaced by the Chevy 6.2L Vortec. 

The Ford 7.3L Godzilla engine is still in production today.

Feature comparisonFord 7.3L Godzilla (gasoline engine)Chevy 6.0L Vortec  (gasoline engine)
Production years2020 to present1999 to 2020
Horsepower430 hp @ 5500 RPMLow: 300 hp @ 4400 RPM
High: 362 hp @ 5400 RPM
Torque475 lb-ft @ 4000 RPMLow: 360 lb-ft @ 4000 RPM
High: 380 lb-ft @ 4400 RPM

Ford 7.3L Godzilla vs. Chevy 5.7L Vortec

Chevy 5.7L Vortec Engine

The Chevrolet 5.7L Vortec (Chevy 5700) was launched in 1996 and well before the launch of the Ford 7.3L Godzilla engine. They are both V8 engines powered by gasoline for heavy-duty and severe-duty trucks.

The Chevy 5.7L Vortec was part of a small-block V8 engine series for General Motors trucks. While it was designed to run on mostly gasoline, the engine also could be powered with liquid propane gas (LPG) and compressed natural gas (CNG) fuels. The Chevy 5.7L Vortec engine was produced from 1996 to 2002 for Chevrolet Express, Chevrolet Suburban, Chevrolet Tahoe, Chevrolet/GMC full-size trucks, and Cadillac Escalade.

The Chevy 5.7L Vortec engine should not be mistaken for the General Motors’ LS (luxury sport) engine, a different engine designated mostly for performance cars such as the Chevrolet Corvette. The Vortec and LS engines shared a similar cast iron engine block design. Big differences between the two engines include the crank bearings, timing cover, water pump, ignition systems, and cylinder heads. 

The Chevy 5.7L Vortec engine was engineered to produce more power, torque, and engine response while improving overall gasoline fuel economy. The Vortec engine had an overhead valve configuration with two valves per cylinder and a four-bolt intake manifold. The Vortec engine had a four-inch bore (also known as cylinder diameter) and a 3.48-inch stroke, or the length a piston moves between top and bottom. This added more horsepower and performance to the engine. The engine’s intake valve and combustion chamber design also are much different than previous truck engine models. The Vortec combustion chamber is a kidney-shaped design that promotes better performance.

The Chevy 5.7L Vortec engine was replaced by the Chevy 5.3L (5300) engine in 2002. However, the Chevy 5.7L Vortec engine is well supported in the aftermarket with replacement components and rebuild kits. There are also aftermarket kits for owners who want to convert their 5.7L Vortec gasoline engines to LPG or CNG. 

The Godzilla engine served as a powerful gasoline engine option to fill the sales gap between the 6.2L Boss and 6.7L Power Stroke diesel engines for F-250, F-350, and Ford Super Duty Tremor ten-speed automatic trucks. It is the base engine for the F-450 to F-600 truck models, as well as the E-350 van. It also can be purchased as a crate engine from the Ford Performance catalog.

The Ford 7.3L Godzilla engine is still in production today.

Feature comparisonFord 7.3L Godzilla
(gasoline engine)
Chevy 5.7L Vortec
(gasoline engine)
Production years2020 to present1996 to 2002
Horsepower430 hp @ 5500 RPM225 HP @ 4600 RPM
Torque475 lb-ft @ 4000 RPM330 lb-ft @ 2800 RPM

Ford 7.3L Godzilla vs. Navistar T444E

T444E Engine in a School Bus

The Navistar T444E (or Power Stroke) and Ford 7.3L Godzilla are completely different engines, but they both were produced for Ford Super Duty trucks.

The Ford 7.3L Godzilla is a naturally aspirated V8 engine featuring an overhead valve (OHV) pushrod design in a V configuration. It is powered by gasoline and is still in production today for Ford Super Duty trucks. It serves as a powerful gasoline engine option to fill the sales gap between the 6.2L Boss and 6.7L Power Stroke diesel engines for F-250, F-350, and Ford Super Duty Tremor ten-speed automatic trucks. It is the base engine for the F-450 to F-600 truck models, as well as the E-350 van. It also can be purchased as a crate engine from the Ford Performance catalog.

Navistar International produced the 7.3L V8 diesel turbocharged engine series from 1994 to 2004 for use in school buses, and Ford trucks and vans. Navistar International created the T444E in response to increased emissions standards in the U.S. and other countries during the mid-1990s.  

The engine, known as the T444E or Power Stroke, is best known for powering Ford Super Duty 250/350 diesel trucks, Ford Excursion sport utility vehicles, and E-series vans. The engine also was part of the bus chassis for Navistar International Type C school buses and other large commercial vehicles.  As emissions regulation increased, Navistar International discontinued the series and replaced it with the all-new 6.0L VT365 to address emissions mandates.

Since the Ford 7.3L Godzilla engine is new, there has not been a lot of long-term data points on reliability. Mechanics report the engine delivers a bit more power and is slightly more capable in power than other engine options. With an iron block, the Godzilla motor can handle high amounts of strain. The average service life of the Ford 7.3L Godzilla engine is 200,000 miles, but good care and regular maintenance can extend the engine to 300,000 miles.

Feature comparisonFord 7.3L Godzilla
(gasoline engine)
T444E
(diesel engine)
Production years2020 to present1994 to 2004
Horsepower430 hp @ 5500 RPMStandard: 184 hp @ 2200 RPM
Optional: 238 hp @ 2300 RPM
Torque475 lb-ft @ 4000 RPMStandard: 460 lb-ft @ 1400 RPM
Optional: 620 lb-ft @ 1400 RPM
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